Ballet Barre FAQ

From the desk of Kristen Reynolds, DPT, PMA®-CPT…

  • What is Ballet Barre?

This class presents a series of exercises that strengthen and lengthen arms and legs, stabilize the core, elongate the spine, and enhance balance. The workout is completed at a barre and on the mat, combining classical repertoire from ballet and Joseph Pilates, as well as evidence-based therapeutic exercises.

 

  • Do I need to bring anything?

Not at all – just come and enjoy your workout! OMBE is proud to incorporate eco-friendly Pilates mats, high-quality Fit Circles, Rejuvenation Mini-Core Balls, and Resist-A-Bands into this class for variety, challenge, and helping individuals experience a deeper muscular connection to the exercises.

 

  • What is the benefit of this workout?

The exercises are presented in a sequence that sculpts and stretches the whole body and elevates heart rate. Participants can expect to see changes in posture, balance, flexibility, and muscle performance.

 

  • I am not a dancer. Is this workout appropriate for me?

This workout was designed by a physical therapist to be a fun and effective method for individuals with varied ages, abilities, and experiences. While the class does include ballet-inspired choreography, it is not solely for the dancers or those with experience. When notified, the instructor will be pleased to modify exercises for injuries as well.

 

  • What should I wear to class?

It is essential for the instructor to be able to observe proper form and alignment for to optimize the safety and effectiveness of the workout. Therefore, we kindly request that you wear comfortable, form fitting athletic clothes. Bare feet are acceptable, but ToeSox are recommended for traction with standing repertoire and can be purchased at OMBE.

 

Kristen Reynolds, DPT, PMA®-CPT
Doctor of Physical Therapy
PMA® Certified Pilates Teacher

Kristen Reynolds earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology with a concentration in Exercise Science from James Madison University in 2006 and a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the MGH Institute of Health Professions in 2009.

While practicing in orthopedics and sports medicine, a mentor introduced her to the Pilates Method and she has since pursued comprehensive certification to compliment her clinical interests. She is certified by the Pilates Method Alliance, the only professional certification in the field, as well as an active member of American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and APTA Sports Physical Therapy Section.

Always interested in sports and fitness, she is a former dancer, YMCA and Junior Olympic gymnast, coach, and ACE personal trainer. Integrating the Pilates principles and repertoire into her physical therapy practice has produced successful rehabilitation outcomes for a wide variety of patients, including adolescents, elite athletes and dancers, and individuals with chronic orthopedic conditions. Kristen utilizes this alternative therapeutic approach to improve muscle performance and joint mobility, correct posture and alignment, enhance body awareness, and create an evenly conditioned body that is more resilient to extremity and spinal injury. She greatly enjoys designing programs to target personal goals, educating clients to incorporate Pilates into their daily activities, and teaching small group Ballet Barre and Mat classes.

 

Share The Love: Massage Specials

From the desk of OMBE

This February 14th, we are going to make your planning a little easier by offering our Valentine’s Day packages Friday, February 10th through Tuesday, February 14th. You can choose one of two packages featuring massage, Pilates, and yoga services to share with your sweetheart, mom, or favorite gal pal.

If you’re looking for a great deal on massage, opt for the Share the Love package.  Purchase any two massages of equal value from February 10th through February 14th and receive 10% off both sessions when you book February.  This offer includes 50 or 80-minute couples massage all month.  Looking to mix up your workout? Bring a friend to any ballet barre, Pilates mat, or yoga class this month and receive OMBE’s 2-for-1 deal. To schedule a massage or reserve your space in a class, just go to our website’s home page and click BOOK ONLINE, email info@ombecenter.com or call 617.447.2222.

 

Fitness Fads for 2012

From the desk of Kristen Reynolds, DPT, PMA®-CPT…

From the American College of Sports Medicine to SHAPE Magazine to ACE Fitness, thousands of health and fitness professionals have weighed in on what they believe to be the biggest fitness trends of the year. After reading through, I found one major theme – OMBE has it all!

1. Educated and experienced fitness professionals

OMBE’s Pilates team consists of two practicing physical therapists, while each of OMBE’s yoga practitioners have completed a minimum of 200 hours with Master trainers for their certifications. With affiliations to Harvard and Brown University, this collection of teachers not only have sincere passion, but bring a great deal of professionalism into the studio.

Resident personal trainer, Kristy Kuhn, is a certified Health/Fitness Specialist through the American College of Sports Medicine and a certified personal trainer through the American Council on Exercise. She received her 500-hour yoga teacher certification through YogaWorks in New York, New York and is registered through Yoga Alliance in addition to a Masters in Fine Arts in Dance from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a Bachelor of Science in Biology, and dance minor from Bucknell University.

2. Personalized Functional Training

Functional training has been on the scene for quite some time now. There are an abundance of bootcamps, TRX classes, and CrossFit programs to choose from in the Boston area.

The problem? They are not one-size fits all. Many individuals are experiencing injury because their bodies are not ready to handle the demands of these high intensity, generalized group workouts.

The solution? See Kristy, Lisa, or Kristen. Physical therapists have been utilizing a functional approach long before it became a buzzword. With respect to your activities of daily living, job demands, and injuries, these three can design a program for you.

3. Small Group Training

Small group sessions are never more than 6 people to 1 trainer. They are an effective and affordable way to receive expert training. Good news you have two options at OMBE!

  1. The studio schedule offers twenty classes each week that are limited to six participants!
  2. Motivate with a group of friends and co-workers and schedule training sessions at a time convenient for you! Group sessions are available for duos, trios, and quads.

4. Barre Workouts

Join Kristen at the ballet barre on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 12:15 for a workout on your lunch hour or at another time for private training. Expect a variety of exercises, including plies, push ups, passes, planks, and port de bras to sculpt and stretch the whole body.

5. Physician Referrals

Did you know that OMBE offers 10% off your first visit if you are referred by your physician?

6. Fusion Workouts

Ballet Barre is a combination of ballet-inspired sequences with Pilates (and an occasional Child’s Pose or two). Keep your eye on the schedule – more fusion may come to OMBE this spring!

7. Whole-Life Training

If you haven’t read OMBE’s philosophy (http://www.ombecenter.com/philosophy/), then please take a look. Our multidisciplinary approach to holistic health will bring incredible balance to your life.

8. Self Myofascial Release

Fascia is a layer of connective tissue layer surrounding muscles, bones and joints that gives support and protection to the body. Myofascial release is a form of soft tissue therapy that will treat pain and restricted motion. OMBE massage therapists and fitness instructors can show you how to work out your “knots” with foam roller massage or t spheres, aromatherapy-infused massage balls from the Eco Beauty Bar that are terrific for travel!

9. Yoga

I mentioned the instructors earlier, but the eco-friendly studio overlooking beautiful views of Copley Square are worth another mention. Students of all levels are welcomed to our classes and private lessons, including those who are prenatal! OMBE’s yoga instructors encourage students to develop their strength, flexibility, and balance as well as a deeper sense of relaxation.

10. Core Training

I find that there are a lot of misconceptions about the core. This region of the body consists of the deepest layers of muscle in the abdomen, lumbar spine, and ribcage. These muscles need to be trained to stabilize the spine and pelvis during dynamic movement. Pilates training (especially on the Reformer) is one of the best ways for the body to acquire this component of physical fitness. See Lisa or Kristen for a demo or private session to learn the correct postural exercises that target the core!

11. Exercise with Diet for Weight Loss

The Winter Cleanse program includes a five yoga classes, a five-day nutrition guide with comprehensive menu plans, mindful eating tips, and recommended supplements. Nutritional counselor Stacy provides easy-to-follow recipes and shopping lists with seasonal items found in your local grocery store of Farmer’s market and nightly activities to help you re-evaluate and clear out other areas of your life. Additionally, you receive access to our online community to connect with others about your experience.

Another option would be to meet with Naturopathic Doctor, Jacqueline Rho, who has helped many patients with weight loss and detoxification and participate in small group or private sessions.

12. Sport Specific Training

Yoga for Runners is one of OMBE’s most popular classes. Another great service is a Running & Gait Analysis with Dr. Erik Vose! During a 30 minute run, Dr. Vose will videotape and evaluate your running form, review your gait and biomechanics, and design an optimal running program for you.

Kristen Reynolds, DPT, PMA®-CPT
Doctor of Physical Therapy
PMA® Certified Pilates Teacher

Kristen Reynolds earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology with a concentration in Exercise Science from James Madison University in 2006 and a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the MGH Institute of Health Professions in 2009.

While practicing in orthopedics and sports medicine, a mentor introduced her to the Pilates Method and she has since pursued comprehensive certification to compliment her clinical interests. She is certified by the Pilates Method Alliance, the only professional certification in the field, as well as an active member of American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and APTA Sports Physical Therapy Section.

Always interested in sports and fitness, she is a former dancer, YMCA and Junior Olympic gymnast, coach, and ACE personal trainer. Integrating the Pilates principles and repertoire into her physical therapy practice has produced successful rehabilitation outcomes for a wide variety of patients, including adolescents, elite athletes and dancers, and individuals with chronic orthopedic conditions. Kristen utilizes this alternative therapeutic approach to improve muscle performance and joint mobility, correct posture and alignment, enhance body awareness, and create an evenly conditioned body that is more resilient to extremity and spinal injury. She greatly enjoys designing programs to target personal goals, educating clients to incorporate Pilates into their daily activities, and teaching small group Ballet Barre and Mat classes.

 

Can Yoga Wreck Your Body?


From the desk of Kristen Lutz, LCMT, MS on behalf of OMBE…

A recent article written in the NY Times entitled ‘Yoga Can Wreck Your Body’ has created an out pour of response in the yoga community.  The article begins with the writer’s story of injury and upon returning to physical activity, he re-injured himself during a yoga class.  From there, the writer interviews a renowned yoga instructor who believes yoga can cause harm and isn’t for everyone.  The yoga instructor was quoted as saying, “The vast majority of people should give up yoga altogether. It’s simply too likely to cause harm…because most have underlying physical weaknesses or problems that make serious injury all but inevitable”.  The article then describes case studies of individuals who suffered from severe injuries and even stroke as a result of yoga.  That’s some pretty serious information to absorb and viewed as extremely controversial.   Especially since the number of Americans practicing yoga has risen from 4 million in 2001 to an estimated 20 million in 2011.

We at OMBE feel it is our responsibility to speak openly about the points brought up in the article.  We think it’s very important to acknowledge any areas where safety is a concern so that we may better serve our own clients.

Here is where we stand on the concern that yoga isn’t for everyone and can cause harm.  We agree! We think it’s absolutely necessary to think twice about any new form of physical activity.  You need to weigh the risks and benefits.  The same would go if you wanted to learn how to ski.  You find a qualified person to teach you, share your medical history, and have all of the right equipment to keep you safe.

OMBE is unique in that we offer a variety of complimentary modalities; all of which play an integral part to the better health and therapeutic goals of each and every client.  Two clients may have the same injury however the mechanism of injury and their past medical histories may be completely different.  Through a team approach and our specialty in sports therapy and rehabilitation, we can get you to a point where something like yoga is beneficial.

Here is what OMBE can provide to ensure a safe and rewarding yoga experience:

·         We take the time and gather full medical histories for all clients – including yoga

·         All of our class instructors (yoga, Pilates and personal training) are certified and all of them have a complimentary area of expertise such as exercise science, kinesiology, dance, physical therapy, and rehabilitation sciences

·         We offer complimentary 30 minute demos so you can get to know us and we can get to know you prior to starting a class

·         Our classes are limited to 6 so you get a lot of one-on-one attention, greatly reducing your risk for injury

When do you know you’re in the wrong yoga class? When your instructor:

·         isn’t certified

·         tells you that you should be able to do a particular pose by now

·         tells you that jumping, pushing, and pulling on you to force you into a pose

·         is not able to effectively offer you modifications

·         insists you go into a pose when you don’t feel comfortable doing so

Book your FREE 30 Minute Yoga Demo at OMBE.  This gives you the opportunity to know if yoga is the right place for you to start.  Perhaps other work such as massage or chiropractic would better serve you initially.  Either way, let us help you maximize your time and effort, while providing a safe environment.


 

My 5-Day New Year’s Cleanse

From the Desk of Katrina Sukola, Yoga Teacher…

 

Next week I will be starting a 5 day New Year’s Cleanse.  Cleansing is a wonderful opportunity to notice how much we use food to cover up our emotions or uncover an underlying blood sugar imbalance. When faced with eating a simplified diet, we are faced with all of our emotional reactions to eating. Instead of panicking or getting stuck in resistance, simply take a few deep breaths and a moment to investigate what the deeper need or emotion is.

 

Benefits of Cleansing

  • Weight loss
  • Increased energy
  • Clear sinuses
  • Improved digestion
  • Jumpstart new eating habits
  • Opportunity to release attachments to sugar, dairy and caffeine

During a cleanse is a great time to really connect with your body. What are some ways that you can take care of yourself while you’re cleansing? How can you nurture yourself in other ways besides food? Some things that I like to do while cleansing are: keep a journal, meditate, practice yoga, spiritual practice, spiritual reading, daily exfoliation, Epsom salt baths, enjoy a sauna or steam, and get a massage.

 

Cleansing, or detoxifying, literally means removing toxins from your body.  Detoxification can create a number of symptoms in your body as your body goes through the process of purifying itself and eliminating toxins.  You will feel some detox symptoms like headaches, muscle aches, irritability, weakness, cravings, and maybe even nausea.  But once these toxins are gone, you will feel more energetic, vital, happy and healthy. It is the toxins that make us feel tired, mentally confused, irritable, unhappy, depressed and ill.  It is helpful to know the symptoms will be gone and to remind yourself that the cleanse meal plan is temporary.

 

If you are interested in learning more about yoga and digestion, try OMBE’s five day nutrition cleanse and yoga series.  This cleanse includes a yoga five-series, a five-day nutrition guide with comprehensive menu plans, mindful eating tips, and recommended supplements. You will receive easy-to-follow recipes and shopping lists with seasonal items found in your local grocery store or Farmer’s market. Nightly activities to help you reevaluate and clear out other areas of your life, unlimited support from your nutrition counselor and access to our online community to connect with others about your experience will also be available.



Katrina Sukola, Yoga Teacher

Katrina has had a lifelong relationship with movement. Dancing from a young age, including ballet and later studying other styles including flamenco and aerial dance. In 2001, she began exploring different styles of yoga such as Vinyasa, Restorative and Anusara yoga. Katrina completed her 200-hour certification with YogaWorks in 2010, training with master yoga teacher Natasha Rizopoulos. Her teaching is strongly influenced by this method, combining Ashtanga’s focus on connecting movement with breath and Iyengar’s attention to precise alignment. Other influences include her teachers Jillian Pransky, Barbara Benagh and Daniel Orlansky.

In both individual and small group settings, students will experience thoughtfully sequenced classes, cultivating body and mental awareness, and finding balance between effort and ease. Katrina teaches yoga for students to increase strength and flexibility while reducing stress and tension, creating calm in both the body and mind. Through continuous practice, Katrina has experienced the powerful mental and physical benefits of yoga, both on and off the mat. Katrina teaches yoga throughout the Boston area and is a member of the dance company Round the Corner Movers. She continues learning and sharing this ancient practice of moving, breathing, and overall well-being.

Next week I will be starting a 5 day New Year’s Cleanse.  Cleansing is a wonderful opportunity to notice how much we use food to cover up our emotions or uncover an underlying blood sugar imbalance. When faced with eating a simplified diet, we are faced with all of our emotional reactions to eating. Instead of panicking or getting stuck in resistance, simply take a few deep breaths and a moment to investigate what the deeper need or emotion is.

 

Benefits of Cleansing

  • Weight loss
  • Increased energy
  • Clear sinuses
  • Improved digestion
  • Jumpstart new eating habits
  • Opportunity to release attachments to sugar, dairy and caffeine

During a cleanse is a great time to really connect with your body. What are some ways that you can take care of yourself while you’re cleansing? How can you nurture yourself in other ways besides food? Some things that I like to do while cleansing are: keep a journal, meditate, practice yoga, spiritual practice, spiritual reading, daily exfoliation, Epsom salt baths, enjoy a sauna or steam, and get a massage.

 

Cleansing, or detoxifying, literally means removing toxins from your body.  Detoxification can create a number of symptoms in your body as your body goes through the process of purifying itself and eliminating toxins.  You will feel some detox symptoms like headaches, muscle aches, irritability, weakness, cravings, and maybe even nausea.  But once these toxins are gone, you will feel more energetic, vital, happy and healthy. It is the toxins that make us feel tired, mentally confused, irritable, unhappy, depressed and ill.  It is helpful to know the symptoms will be gone and to remind yourself that the cleanse meal plan is temporary.

 

If you are interested in learning more about yoga and digestion, try OMBE’s five day nutrition cleanse and yoga series.  This cleanse includes a yoga five-series, a five-day nutrition guide with comprehensive menu plans, mindful eating tips, and recommended supplements. You will receive easy-to-follow recipes and shopping lists with seasonal items found in your local grocery store or Farmer’s market. Nightly activities to help you reevaluate and clear out other areas of your life, unlimited support from your nutrition counselor and access to our online community to connect with others about your experience will also be available.



Katrina Sukola, Yoga Teacher

Katrina has had a lifelong relationship with movement. Dancing from a young age, including ballet and later studying other styles including flamenco and aerial dance. In 2001, she began exploring different styles of yoga such as Vinyasa, Restorative and Anusara yoga. Katrina completed her 200-hour certification with YogaWorks in 2010, training with master yoga teacher Natasha Rizopoulos. Her teaching is strongly influenced by this method, combining Ashtanga’s focus on connecting movement with breath and Iyengar’s attention to precise alignment. Other influences include her teachers Jillian Pransky, Barbara Benagh and Daniel Orlansky.

In both individual and small group settings, students will experience thoughtfully sequenced classes, cultivating body and mental awareness, and finding balance between effort and ease. Katrina teaches yoga for students to increase strength and flexibility while reducing stress and tension, creating calm in both the body and mind. Through continuous practice, Katrina has experienced the powerful mental and physical benefits of yoga, both on and off the mat. Katrina teaches yoga throughout the Boston area and is a member of the dance company Round the Corner Movers. She continues learning and sharing this ancient practice of moving, breathing, and overall well-being.

 

Eco-Beauty: What Do All The Certifications Mean?

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO…

So, you’ve finally decided to ditch the old lipstick and moisturizer in your beauty bag in favor of green, eco-friendly alternatives given the growing number of options out there.  But how do you know that something that you will put on your skin every day is really a better alternative?  In addition to reading ingredients, one way is to check for certifications.  Here’s a list of eco-certifications and organizations in alphabetical order to help you clarify what’s in that jar of magic cream and how to shop green:

 

ACO: (Australian Certified Organic)

These products contain (excluding water and salt) at least 95% organically produced agricultural ingredients. The  remaining ingredients (up to 5%) can be non-agricultural substances or non-organically produced agricultural ingredients, with strict processing criteria (e.g. absolutely no GMOs or synthetics chemicals).

 

BFA: (Biological Farmers of Australia)

Made with organic ingredients products contain (excluding water and salt) at least 70% organically produced agricultural ingredients. Any remaining can be non-agricultural substances (eg. Clay, bicarb soda, minerals) or non-organically produced agricultural ingredients with strict processing criteria (e.g. absolutely no GMOs or synthetics chemicals). Mineral based products contain non-agricultural substances (e.g. clay, bicarb soda, minerals), with strict processing criteria (e.g. absolutely no GMOs or synthetics chemicals).

 

CALIFORNIA ORGANIC PRODUCTS ACT: (COPA 2003)

Any product that does not meet COPA requirements cannot legally be sold as organic in the State of California.  The product is not considered organic unless that product meets the criteria of 70% organic content. This is calculated based on the actual agricultural organic content which does not include “water” and “extracts”.  This means water and extracts rarely contribute more than 1% of the total organic content.

 

 

CERTIFIED ORGANIC:

Products that contain at least 95% organic ingredients can claim to be certificated organic and will bear the USDA organic logo. These products may contain up to 5% non-organically produced agricultural ingredients that are not commercially available in organic form and/ or a short list of other neutral (e.g. not harmful) substances as allowed by USDA organic regulations.

ECOCERT:

Is an internationally recognized organic certification that guarantees the genuine practice of environmental respect throughout the formulation and manufacturing of the product. The certification ensures that 100% of the total ingredients are of a natural origin. Ecocert is the leading European authority on organic certification, and the standards used by prestige organic brands. It’s the only organic certification for color cosmetics.

 

 

NATURAL:

Organic and Natural are not the same. The term natural is not regulated and has a broad meaning. According to government labeling requirements, it means that an ingredient “has not been significantly altered from its original state, nor has anything been removed from it (with the exception of water).  It also means that no other substances been added to it.

 

NOP: (National Organic Program)

Develops, implements, and administers national production, handling, and labeling standards for organic agricultural products. The NOP also accredits the certifying agents (foreign and domestic) who inspect organic production and handling operations to certify that they meet USDA.

 

NSF International: (National Sanitation Foundation)

This organization helps protect you by certifying products and writing standards for food, water and consumer goods. As an independent, nor-for-profit organization, their ongoing public health commitment is to encourage everyone to live safer.

 

OASIS: (Organic and Sustainable Industry Standards)

This is the only cosmetic and skincare “organic” certification and is also a private, rather than a governmental certification. The standards are meant to bring some sort of standardization to personal care industry organic claims.  This standard requires 85% certified organic content which will be expected to increase as green chemistry and products evolve.

 

ORGANIC:

Organic refers to the way plants and food are grown.  This is a strict standard that ensures no synthetic chemicals, fertilizers, pesticides, sewage sludge, or Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are used.  It also suggests that animal welfare and the environment is respected.

  • Organic products are made with ingredients grown without any synthetic chemicals, sewage sludge or genetically modified organisms. Organic products do not contain synthetic ingredients.
  • Products only labeled “natural” often use synthetic preservatives and other un-natural ingredients, alongside plant ingredients, and get labeled natural with only few ingredients actually being “natural”.

OTA: (Organic Trade Association)

This is the membership-based business association for the organic industry in North America. OTA’s mission is to promote and protect organic trade to benefit the environment, farmers, the public and the economy. OTA represents businesses across the organic supply chain and addresses all things organic, including food, fiber/textiles, personal care products, and new sectors as they develop. Over sixty percent of OTA trade members are small businesses.

 

SOIL ASSOCIATION:

Ensures the integrity of the products in relation to the environmental impact of their farming and long-term sustainability of the crops. No chemical fertilizers or pesticides are permitted in the growing of the crop.

 

USDA: (United States Department of Agriculture)

These products meet the strict ingredients and processing criteria in accordance with the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. Jessica first became interested in acupuncture as a soccer player searching for an alternative to knee surgery.

She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine and Chinese Herbology through the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). Following her acupuncture licensure, she became a Diplomate of Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Areas of specialty include women’s health, infertility, pediatrics, and sports medicine. For patients interested in learning more about acupuncture for fertility and IVF, please click here.

 

Book online for any acupuncture service in our Boston location or contact OMBE for additional information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marathon Training: 10 Tips from OMBE

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO…

 

It’s that season again-yes, winter but also marathon training season!  Every year the team at OMBE helps runners of all fitness levels and experience from first-time marathoners to experienced pros.  We put together a list of our top 10 tips for training from an integrative medicine prospective.  This month through April, check out all of our special packages and services designed to help all you 26.2-milers.  If you’re running Boston this year, you’ll receive 20% off massages now through April.  Check out Dr. Erik Vose’s running gait assessment with a friend and score a 2-for-1 deal on your session.  Think about cross-training with our Yoga for Runners or Pilates classes.  In the meantime, check out these tips:

Start on the Right Foot

How do you prepare for an endurance event that will test all of your physical and mental mettle?  Take a moment to consider your overall health and well-being.  Find a sports medicine specialist to evaluate your physical condition, address biomechanical imbalances, or perform a gait analysis to prevent future injuries.  Developing a pre-training plan with an expert will help you reach an optimal training level and address any underlying issues before you begin to add up the miles.

Get Well

Instead of waiting for the first signs of injury, schedule a “well” check-up every four to six weeks to identify signs of physical stress.  Check-in with a training coach, chiropractor, or strength and conditioning specialist to help you develop a self-care routine during your training.  Athletes are often afraid to seek treatment when they notice the first sign of pain or discomfort.  Treating an acute injury optimizes your chance at recovery and minimizes the risk of long-term damage or chronic pain.

Cross Train

Cross-training by incorporating multiple physical modalities will help you customize a routine, prevent over-training and address areas of weakness.  Substitute different forms of cardiovascular exercise, strength training, speed intervals, or exercise rehabilitation.  Don’t forget to rest.  If you’re training for 26.2 miles or any endurance event, you need one to two days of hard-core rest combined with one cross-training or light training day.

Build Core Strength

Core strength training refers to the conditioning of the stabilizing muscles of your spine, pelvis, and torso.  These muscles provide a foundation for all physical movement.  When you increase their strength, you increase your power, speed, and stride efficiency.  This training season, substitute a Pilates class for crunches. Pilates is one form of exercise that builds core strength as well as being a powerful tool for injury prevention and increasing athletic performance.

Stretch Yourself

You’ve heard it before but you still can’t touch your toes. Would you try stretching if it restored your muscles to their normal length so that they contract at their optimal resting potential? Would you try stretching if it increased your range of motion? You know the routine: warm-up, hold each stretch for 30 seconds, do not bounce, and spend at least 15 minutes focusing on lower-body muscle groups.  Here’s the alternative that we love just as much: the foam roller.  Spend 5-10 minutes rolling out various muscle groups, paying attention to trigger points.  The massage and myofascial release may just help your stride whether or not you can touch your toes.

Don’t Bonk!

Bonking, otherwise known as “crashing” or “hitting the wall” is the dreaded, race-day phenomenon causing endurance athletes to suffer from exhaustion, extreme muscle fatigue, and symptoms of hypoglycemia. In addition to carbohydrate loading, watch for signs of overtraining as you prepare for your event. Symptoms include a higher resting heart rate, low appetite, high blood pressure, weight loss, difficulty sleeping, irritability, and generalized fatigue. If you notice any of these signs, reevaluate your training or see an expert before you get deeper into your workouts.

Discover Massage

If you’ve never had a good excuse to treat yourself to a regular massage, here’s your chance.  Regular massage reduces lactic acid build-up that can cause cramping and contribute to muscle fatigue.   A great sports massage can improve your range of motion while managing aches and pains.  If you can’t find the time to get regular massages during your training, schedule a session one to two weeks before your event, visit the massage tent after you cross the finish line, and have a massage within seven days after your big race.

Belly Up to the Pasta Bar

It’s time to make friends with complex carbohydrates.  Incorporating a nutrition program customized for your refueling needs can be more challenging than completing your first 10K.  Some of you should belly up to the pasta bar, while others will focus on electrolyte replacement, hydration, and increasing essential fatty acids.  Sitting down with a nutritional counselor can take the guess work out of what to eat for those 1,000 meals each year.  Don’t forget those post-run snacks to help refuel your glycogen stores.  Start with a nut-butter and a banana for your muscles (and belly) will thank you.

Stay Local

Sign up for local events to help keep you on track. Choose races that correspond with the mileage you are working towards. The anticipated races will keep you motivated to work towards short-term goals and it’s always good to get SWAG (Stuff We All Get).  Hello, goody bags, t-shirts, energy bars, and coupons!

 

Try Sport Psychology

Endurance training is all about mental preparation.  To prepare for your next event, experiment with different forms of relaxation such as meditation, visualization, and body awareness.  If you don’t know where to begin, try yoga.  Each yoga session, will help you clear your mind, develop powerful breathing techniques, and visualize your sweet race-day success.

 

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. Jessica first became interested in acupuncture as a soccer player searching for an alternative to knee surgery.

She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine and Chinese Herbology through the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). Following her acupuncture licensure, she became a Diplomate of Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Areas of specialty include women’s health, infertility, pediatrics, and sports medicine. For patients interested in learning more about acupuncture for fertility and IVF, please click here.

 

Book online for any acupuncture service in our Boston location or contact OMBE for additional information.

 

 

An Interview with Our Pilates Instructor: Lisa Grodsky, CPT, MSPT

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.ac., DNBAO…

 

This month, Lisa Grodsky, CPT, MSPT had a moment to sit down with us to talk more about Pilates and answer our questions about exercise!

 

You’ve been a  Certified STOTT Pilates instructor since 2004. What are the differences between STOTT Pilates and other types of Pilates?

STOTT Pilates is a progressive approach to Pilates, based on the same principles of the original method of Joseph Pilates, incorporating modern knowledge of the body and including modifications to address special populations.

 

You learned the value of Pilates through your own rehabilitation from knee surgery… could you share you story with us?

I tore my ACL skiing and part of my physical therapy treatment included work with a Pilates instructor to work on range of motion and strength.

 

What do you think are the greatest benefits of your Pilates class (Tuesday nights @ 6pm)?

The class is mat-based, which focuses primarily on core strength and spinal flexibility.  The benefits of this combination are improved posture and developing a stronger base from which the limbs are moving.

 

You also work in outpatient orthopedics with an emphasis in sports medicine… so is your training more preventative or therapeutic?

My training is a combination…my clients come to me for both prevention and treatment of their injuries as well as for general health and fitness.

 

Now people are presented with a wide range of choices when it comes to fitness and weight-loss. So who do you think need STOTT Pilates most?

Anyone and everyone may benefit from Pilates!  I see people who are recovering from an injury, runners, golfers, gymnasts, prenatal clients, and then the average every-day person that wants to maximize their results with the time they have to exercise.

 

What are the most common issues/problems you’ve seen from your clients/patients?

The most common problems are low back and neck dysfunction, followed by knee, hip, and shoulder.

 

Apart from training your clients for a better body, do you also coach them toward sound mental health? How do you advise your clients about stress?

There is not a significant spiritual component to Pilates but there is a huge emphasis on the mind-body connection along with breath work.  If clients come in and need to unload about something…we end up talking through a particular problem but without any sort of structure!

 

Now let’s talk more about Pilates in general. Some people confuse yoga with Pilates… what are the differences and similarities between the two fitness practices in your opinion? Are they more appropriate for a certain segment of people?

I can’t speak much about yoga but people do ask me this all the time!  The main differences, in my opinion, are that Pilates focuses more on core strength while yoga focuses more on flexibility.  Additionally, yoga generally has a spiritual component while Pilates does not.

 

How long does a whole program last for your training? Can people practice Pilates without professional guidance? My training included a 40-hour matwork training and a 50-hour reformer training, plus practice and observation hours in addition to completing a Masters in physical therapy.  I don’t believe people should practice Pilates without professional training-it’s better to begin with a trained individual to maximize the benefits of each exercise AND avoid injury.

 

What are your greatest professional accomplishments and setbacks in your own point of view? To date, my greatest professional accomplishment is pursuing Pilates and incorporating it into my physical therapy practice.  I feel that this sets me apart from my colleagues in both settings.  So far, no setbacks!

 

What are the biggest challenges, in your opinion, for a person who strives for better health and shape?

The biggest challenge is encouraging clients to be patient and stay motivated to stick with a program, whether it is a physical therapy rehab program or a Pilates fitness program.  Many people are looking for the “quick fix” but that is not realistic when it comes to health and fitness.

 

What part of your job do you enjoy the most?

Helping people get back to being active and doing what they like to do.

 

Why did you choose to come to OMBE? What are the pronouncing differences between OMBE and other similar health centers that set OMBE apart?

Having done all of my training on the West coast, I saw the value in combining alternative forms of care with traditional treatments.  I enjoy being able to combine my experiences as a physical therapist and Pilates instructor to help my clients and OMBE allows me to do this.

 

What do you think makes you stand out among all the Pilates instructors out there?

I think what sets me apart from other Pilates instructors is my rehabilitation background and knowledge of anatomy.

 

Lisa Grodsky, MSPT, CPI

Certified Pilates Instructor & Physical Therapist

Lisa Grodsky received her Masters degree in physical therapy from University of California, San Francisco in 2003 and has been a certified STOTT Pilates instructor since 2004. She first discovered Pilates in 1999 while in physical therapy after knee surgery and quickly learned the value that it had in the outcome of her rehabilitation.

The majority of Lisa’s physical therapy work has been in outpatient orthopedics, with an emphasis in sports medicine. She has worked to combine Pilates and physical therapy, as she believes they are effective together in gaining and maintaining strength and flexibility, preventing and rehabilitating injuries, improving posture, and increasing athletic performance. Lisa uses Pilates in her practice with clients who have spine, hip, knee, ankle, and shoulder conditions. She works with marathoners and triathletes, in individual and small group settings. She also develops home Pilates and exercise programs for clients to maximize what they learn in the studio.

Book online for any private session or mat class in our Boston Pilates studio or contact OMBE for additional information.

 

 

 

A Lovely View of History at OMBE

From the desk of Sarah J. Rogers, LMT…

 

For those who have visited us at OMBE before, you know we are lucky to have a wonderful view of Copley Square.  Four flights of altitude allow us to look out and down with a unique perspective, quieted and peaceful – unexpected in this busy part of our city.  I thought it would be fun to share a bit of information distributed by Boston History and Architecture about just what we are looking at when we take in the view immediately outside of our Pilates and Yoga studios.

 

Come join us, and enjoy the view! ~ Sarah J. Rogers

 

Trinity Church

H.H. Richardson, Built 1872 – 1877

 

James O’Gorman described Trinity as “a cultural event of the first importance in American history.” The building both represents a departure of the Boston’s mind from its Puritan past, and emergence of American creativity as a force in architecture. However, Trinity didn’t happen for architecture’s sake, it happened in no small part because of its pastor, Phillips Brooks.

 

Richardsonian Romanesque

Like all Romanesque architecture, Trinity is articulated with round-headed arches. The Richardsonian style draws on the strength of rusticated rock faces, with structural features like arches and lintels made of a different type of stone. Plain areas left almost unfinished are also part of the style. Deep window revels and wrought iron ornaments amplify the building’s feeling of massiveness. Rounded protruding bays topped with cones, and square towers are topped with pyramidal tops are hallmarks of this style.

 

Richardson used bold ornamentation in ways that define sections of the building. Here on Trinity, the lower part of the building is dark, the top is red. Chevrons highlight the front protrusion of the church. A continuous band of checkerboard circles the chapel, like a belt, bringing the lower and upper sections together. Though incorporating styles from many origins, Richardson disciplined his designs. Form served function, and was often based on the careful use of ratios and symmetrical balance.

 

Trinity’s Unusual Construction

40 years before Trinity was built the 580 acres comprising Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood were tidal marsh and unable to support buildings. Turning this marsh into a fashionable neighborhood and nearly doubling the city’s area makes filling the Back Bay one of America’s most ambitious public works projects.

 

Trinity Church’s main building materials are Monson granite and Longmeadow sandstone. Its tower alone weighs 90 million pounds. To support this immense weight, 4000 cedar piles were pounded beneath the water table in a ninety foot square. Unlike its neighbor The Hancock Tower which had the advantage of manufactured materials like concrete and iron piles, all the piles supporting Trinity Church are made of wood.

 

These piles support four granite pyramids (35 feet square, and 17 feet high) which form a “pass through” area where water rises and falls. If the wooden piles are exposed to air they would begin to rot. A pumping system measures the underground water level, and keeps it somewhere in the 17 foot range of the pyramids. The same wooden piles have supported Trinity Church since its construction.

 

Sarah J. Rogers, LMT

Licensed Massage Therapist

Sarah J. Rogers is a licensed massage therapist who received her training at the Cortiva Institute in Watertown, Massachusetts. Her practice focuses on the mind-body relationship and the usefulness of this connection not only for healing, but also for seeking balance in everyday life. Sarah brings her experience as an athlete and her compassion for mind-body health to her practice, inspiring growth and comfort in her clients. Along with massage, Sarah is now offering Active Isolated Stretching which can be done alone or in tandem with massage therapy. Employing techniques focusing on relaxation, neuromuscular therapy, stretching, myofascial release, and overall balance, Sarah will work with you to develop a treatment style that suits your needs.

“Good for the body is the work of the body, good for the soul is the work of the soul and good for either is the work of the other.” -Henry David Thoreau.

 

Get Movin’!

From the desk of Sarah J. Rogers…

 

We recently shared some ideas with you regarding a new perspective on resolutions whether at the start of a new year or in any other season.  As we often find, getting started is the hardest part; getting ourselves to begin what we know may be challenging or even simply different is rarely as easy as talking about beginning.  Well, for those of you who have resolutions that touch upon fitness, OMBE has a staff that can supply you with a comprehensive wellness plan; we even have our own personal trainer:  meet Kristy Kuhn.

 

If the average gym has you intimidated or is simply not your scene, if you prefer 1-1  training or are looking for a space to learn about your body, your health and  to challenge your own concepts of self-growth then Kristy is a great trainer to start with.  Friendly and motivating, our personal trainer is also a dancer and an OMBE yoga teacher.  Her focus on total body awareness, breath and alignment tie her yoga and dance work into her workout regimens.  Kristy’s workout style allows each client to voice their goals and intentions while also giving them space to continually re-map their fitness plan.  Much of her strength and endurance programming uses the client’s own weight and therefore can serve clients seeking gentler work as well as those requiring more enduring workouts.

 

Call OMBE today to set up a meeting with Kristy and kick start your goals in our beautiful studio with a view!  We know that getting through the door can be the hardest part and encourage you to come join us!  We look forward to seeing you.

 

Sarah J. Rogers, LMT

Licensed Massage Therapist

Sarah J. Rogers is a licensed massage therapist who received her training at the Cortiva Institute in Watertown, Massachusetts. Her practice focuses on the mind-body relationship and the usefulness of this connection not only for healing, but also for seeking balance in everyday life. Sarah brings her experience as an athlete and her compassion for mind-body health to her practice, inspiring growth and comfort in her clients. Along with massage, Sarah is now offering Active Isolated Stretching which can be done alone or in tandem with massage therapy. Employing techniques focusing on relaxation, neuromuscular therapy, stretching, myofascial release, and overall balance, Sarah will work with you to develop a treatment style that suits your needs.

“Good for the body is the work of the body, good for the soul is the work of the soul and good for either is the work of the other.” -Henry David Thoreau.