BE: hydration

From the desk of Sarah J. Rogers, LMT…

Yeah yeah, it’s like flossing and stretching and making time for yourself – hydration smydration.  Somehow it is one of those things that many of us have a very hard time staying – HYDRATED that is.  With the onset of warmer weather, it becomes even easier to get dehydrated with our bodies continuously sweating and acclimating to the heat.  Ensuring that you are properly hydrated will help you in many ways: improving muscular function, brain functioning, energy levels and overall body health.  If you are a fitness guru and cannot help but want to run outside and get your workout on, take some precautions and always pay attention for the onset of any of the following signs/symptoms associated with heat-related sicknesses:

 

  • Muscle cramps
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion

As they say, waiting until you are thirsty or miserable usually means that your symptoms have progressed enough that it’s too late to reverse them quickly and, obviously, too late to prevent them.  The Mayo Clinic suggests the following preventive measures to keep from experiencing heat-related illnesses:

 

  • Watch the temperature. Pay attention to weather forecasts and heat alerts. Know what the temperature is expected to be for the duration of your planned outdoor activity.
  • Get acclimated. If you’re used to exercising indoors or in cooler weather, take it easy at first when you exercise in the heat. As your body adapts to the heat over the course of one to two weeks, gradually increase the length and intensity of your workouts.
  • Know your fitness level. If you’re unfit or new to exercise, be extra cautious when working out in the heat. Your body may have a lower tolerance to the heat. Reduce your exercise intensity and take frequent breaks.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Dehydration is a key factor in heat illness. Help your body sweat and cool down by staying well hydrated with water. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. If you plan to exercise intensely or for longer than one hour, consider a sports drink instead of water. Sports drinks can replace the sodium, chloride and potassium you lose through sweating. Avoid  alcoholic drinks because they can actually promote fluid loss.
  • Dress appropriately. Lightweight, loosefitting clothing helps sweat evaporate and keeps you cooler. Avoid dark colors, which can absorb heat. If possible, wear a light-colored, wide-brimmed hat.
  • Avoid midday sun. Exercise in the morning or evening, when it’s likely to be cooler outdoors. If possible, exercise in shady areas — or do a water workout in a pool.
  • Wear sunscreen. A sunburn decreases your body’s ability to cool itself.
  • Have a backup plan. If you’re concerned about the heat or humidity, stay indoors. Work out at the gym, walk laps inside the mall or climb stairs inside an air-conditioned building.
  • Understand your medical risks. Certain medical conditions or medications can increase your risk of a heat-related illness. If you plan to exercise in the heat, talk to your doctor about precautions.

For those who don’t spend much time in the sun – hydration plays an equally important role in your life !!!!!  Strenuous exercises, especially those done outside in the heat or in hot conditions – certainly put additional strain on the body – making hydration an even more immediate concern, but always remember – our bodies require water.

 

For sunscreen, OMBE recommends BADGER sunscreens.  A trusted and wonderful brand – good for the skin, good for the environment.

 

Train safely!

 

Sarah J. Rogers, LMT

Licensed Massage Therapist

Sarah J. Rogers is a licensed massage therapist and an internationally certified personal trainer. She received her training at The Cortiva Institute in Watertown, MA and The American Academy of Personal Training in Boston, MA. She is a member of the American Massage Therapy Association and of the American College of Sports Medicine. Having received her BA in Anthropology and History of Science at Smith College, she shares a deep intellectual and philosophical connection to her clients and work.

Sarah works with each client to develop a comprehensive treatment to suit each client’s goals. She incorporates neuromuscular therapy, advanced osteopathic stretching, myofascial release, stretching, and personal training. She also integrates relaxation, meditation and motivation techniques. Sarah understands and appreciates the various ways in which people use their bodies to get through their every day lives, and enjoys the process of tracing the source of discomfort and injury.

A life-long athlete, Sarah enjoys yoga, running, swimming and biking among other things. Sarah has coached swimming, participates in special education wellness programs (Cantor Youth & Special Olympics). Sarah believes that holistic and traditional health should be equally accessible to every individual. She participates in the Collaborative Health For All initiative by Jill’s List in collaboration with Boston Medical Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.

“Good for the body is the work of the body, good for the soul is the work of the soul and good for either is the work of the other.” -Henry David Thoreau.


 

Women’s Health Book List

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO…

Here’s a  book list I’ve put together over the past few years of several texts that are great resources for women’s health issues including pregnancy, childbirth, fertility treatment, PCOS, endometriosis, and much more.

WOMEN’S HEALTH BOOK LIST

WOMEN’S HEALTH

 

  • Northrop, Christine. Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom. New York, NY: Bantam Books, 2002.
  • Agee, Eve. The Uterine Health Companion: A Holistic Guide to Lifelong Wellness. New York, NY: Celestial Arts; 1 Edition, 2010.

 

INFERTILITY BOOKS

 

  • Barbieri, Robert L., Domar, Alice D. Ph.D., and Loughlin, Kevin R. M.D. 6 Steps to Increased Fertility: An Integrated Medical and Mind/Body Approach To Promote Conception . New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 2000.
  • Weschler, Toni. Taking Charge of Your Fertility: The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health. New York, NY: Harper-Collins, 2002.
  • Lewis, Randine. The Infertility Cure: The Ancient Chinese Wellness Program for Getting Pregnant and Having Healthy Babies. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company, 2005.
  • Holland, Julie Renee. Natural Infertility Treatments. Julie Renee Callaway, 2011.
  • Glenville, Marilyn. Natural Solutions to Infertility: How to Increase Your Chances of Conceiving and Preventing Miscarriage. New York, NY: M.Evans & Company, 2001.
  • Chavarro, Jorge., Willett, Walter., Skerrett, Patrick. The Fertility Diet: Groundbreaking Research Reveals Natural Ways to Boost Ovulation and Improve Your Chances of Getting Pregnant. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2008.
  • David, S. Sami., Blakeway, Jill. Making Babies: A Proven 3-Month Program for Maximum Fertility. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company, 2009.

 

PCOS BOOKS

 

  • Wright, Hillary. The PCOS Diet Plan: A Natural Approach to Health for Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. New York, NY: Random House Inc, 2010.
  • Harris, Colette., Cheung, Theresa. The Ultimate PCOS Handbook: Lose Weight, Boost Fertility, Clear Skin and Restore Self-Esteem. San Francisco, CA: Conari Press, 2008.
  • Legro, Richard S. M.D., Boss, Angela., Weidman, Evelina Sterling. Living with PCOS: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Omaha, Nebraska: Addicus Books, Inc, 2001.
  • Thatcher, Samual S. PCOS The Hidden Epidemic. Indianapolis, IN: Perspectives Press, 2000.

 

  • Grassi, Angela., Mattei, Stephanie., Troiano, Leah., David, Christine. The PCOS Workbook: Your Guide to Complete Physical and Emotional Health. Haverford, PA: Luca Publishing, 2009.

 

ENDOMETRIOSIS BOOKS

 

  • Ballweg, Mary Lou. Endometriosis. The Complete Reference for Taking Charge of Your Health. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2003.
  • Ballweg, Mary Lou. The Endometriosis Sourcebook. Chicago, Illinois: McGraw-Hill, 1995.
  • Mills, Shepperson Dian., Vernon, Michael. Endometriosis: A Key to Healing Through Nutrition. Thorsons, 2002.
  • Worwood, Valerie Ann. The Endometriosis Natural Treatment Program: A Complete Self-Help Plan for Improving Health and Well-being. Novato, California: New World Library, 2007.
  • Levett, Carolyn. Reclaim Your Life- Your Guide to Aid Healing of Endometriosis. Endo Resolved, 2008.
  • Levett, Carolyn. Recipes for the Endometriosis Diet. Endo Resolved, 2007.
  • “The Endometriosis Association.” N.p., 2011. Web. 11 Jul 2011. <http://www.endometriosisassn.org/>.

 

PREGNANCY, CHILD BIRTH PREPARATION & HYPNO-BIRTHING

 

  • Kitzinger, Sheila. The Complete Book of Pregnancy and Childbirth. New York, NY: Knopf, 1996
  • England, Pam., Horowitz, Rob. Birthing from Within: An Extra-Ordinary Guide to Childbirth Preparation. Partera Press, 1998.
  • Mongan, Marie F. HypnoBirthing: The Mongan Method: A Natural Approach to a Safe, Easier, more Comfortable Birthing. Deerfield Beach, FL: HCI, 2005.
  • Balaskas, Janet. Active Birth: The New Approach to Giving Birth Naturally, Revised Edition. Boston, MA: Harvard Common Press, 1992
  • Ingraham, Erick., McCutcheon-Rosegg, Susan., Burningham, Robin Yoko. Natural Childbirth the Bradley Way: Revised Edition. New York, NY: Plume Book, 1996.
  • Gaskin, Ina May. Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth. New York, NY: Bantam, 2003
  • Gaskin, Ina May., DiFranco, Ani. Birth Matters: A Midwife’s Manifesta. New York, NY: Seven Stories Press, 2011
  • Wolfe, Naomi. Misconceptions: Truth, Lies, and the Unexpected on the Journey to Motherhood. Anchor, 2003.

 

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. Jessica first became interested in acupuncture as a soccer player searching for an alternative to knee surgery.

She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine and Chinese Herbology through the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (NCCAOM). Following her acupuncture licensure, she became a Diplomate of Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Areas of specialty include women’s health, infertility, pediatrics, and sports medicine. For patients interested in learning more about acupuncture for fertility and IVF, please click here.

 

Book online for any acupuncture service in our Boston location or contact OMBE for additional information.

 

REINVENT YOUR WORKOUT!

From the desk of Sarah J. Rogers, LMT…
Considering variables to manipulate your workout can be hard when you’ve been doing the same workout year in and year out.  We all know the bicep curl, bench press, triceps extension, squat and lunge workout – – RIGHT?  One thing that many gym-goers don’t consider is the possible redundancy of their workouts.  Doing MORE exercises does not necessarily lead to better results, faster results or even a healthier outcome.  Often, the diversity that one provides by simply tacking on more exercises – leads to repetitive use injuries.  These injuries are very commonly found in the shoulders and knees to include rotator cuff imbalances and discomfort, labral tears, resultant poor tracking of the patella etc.
So, how are you supposed to prevent this?
As trainers, we LOVE to manipulate variables in workouts – that’s how you keep them interesting and challenging.  We’re going to give you several ideas throughout the summer on how to change your workouts to minimize the possibility of over-use injuries, to challenge yourself in a different way, and to improve your results.  The first variable we will address is TEMPO.  Consider a workout when you may do bicep curls, seated rows, lat pull downs, overhead press etc…… Instead of doing all of these exercises in one workout, spread them into two or three workouts throughout the week.  Perhaps for your first workout you choose seated row and overhead press.  Depending on the equipment used, grips etc – all of these exercises engage the biceps so doing them all in one workout is over-work for the biceps and synergistic muscles; our muscles need time to recover in order to become stronger and more powerful.  Working with tempo, you can get that increased effort you want without the redundancy that is potentially damaging.  Where your original sets may look something like this:
3 SETS 12 BICEP CURL
3 SETS 12 SEATED ROW
3 SETS 12 LAT PULL DOWN
3 SETS 12 OVERHEAD PRESS
Consider changing up your upper body choices in this way:
3 SETS OF 10 SEATED ROW
3 SETS OF 10 OVERHEAD PRESS
During these sets, use less weight than you normally would and use all the normal precautions regarding posture and form.  There are 3 phases of a regular strength exercise: CONCENTRIC, ISOMETRIC, ECCENTRIC.  The concentric phase on your row will be when you are pulling towards you, the isometric is the pause before you reverse your movement, and the eccentric is the release back to the starting position.  These terms are useful for all exercises and can be manipulated for lower body, core etc.  For your 3 sets of 10 seated rows, take 3 seconds to pull the weight into your core, hold for 3 seconds, then release on 5 seconds – keeping your shoulders down and back and your neck relaxed.  If you are someone who needs a workout log to follow, you could write it like this:
3 SETS OF 10 SEATED ROW (3-3-5)
3 SETS OF 10 OVERHEAD PRESS (3-3-5)
Try changing things up in the gym once in a while, especially if you are finding that you peak or plateau.  Our bodies respond to change.  Following are some tempo examples that you can use for your next workout.  Remember that if it causes pain or discomfort, discontinue what you are doing and take a break.  Additionally, you may notice that some books and magazines will write the eccentric phase first (E-I-C) rather than (C-I-E).  Do what works for you and do not get caught up on these semantics.  The exercises will be the same in the end.  The examples below are given in (C-I-E) format:
TEMPO VARIATION:
1-1-1 (move on a one count, hold for a one count, release on a one count)
>>>This can raise the heart rate and can be good for those conscious of losing fat – but ALWAYS BE AWARE OF POSTURE AND SAFETY
1-2-1 (move on a one count, hold for a two count, release on a one count)
1-3-1 (move on a one count, hold for a three count, release on a one count)
1-4-1 (move on a one count, hold for a four count, release on a one count)
>>>Here, the holding in the middle gets longer and longer.  These are called isometric holds and are great for building durability.  However these are not advised for those with issues with blood pressure, so ask your physician if you have any concerns
3-3-5 (move on a three count, hold for a three count, release on a five count)
>>>Here, you begin to focus on durable strength with nice slow, deliberate movements and holds.
Manipulating tempo can be fun, but it can also be confusing if you try to do too much of it in one workout.  Try picking ONE tempo variation and use that several times within your workout rather than having so many you forget what you are doing.  Once you become comfortable changing tempo and keeping track of it, then perhaps introduce more variations within a workout.  Tempo can be applied to power movements and plyometric movemets as well, though those types of movements require special precautions.  The above suggestions are for basic strength movements that do not involve jumping.
Need ideas or have questions?  Please contact me.
Enjoy the new rhythm!
Sarah J. Rogers, LMT/CPT AAPT

Licensed Massage Therapist

Sarah J. Rogers is a licensed massage therapist and an internationally certified personal trainer. She received her training at The Cortiva Institute in Watertown, MA and The American Academy of Personal Training in Boston, MA. She is a member of the American Massage Therapy Association and of the American College of Sports Medicine. Having received her BA in Anthropology and History of Science at Smith College, she shares a deep intellectual and philosophical connection to her clients and work.

Sarah works with each client to develop a comprehensive treatment to suit each client’s goals. She incorporates neuromuscular therapy, advanced osteopathic stretching, myofascial release, stretching, and personal training. She also integrates relaxation, meditation and motivation techniques. Sarah understands and appreciates the various ways in which people use their bodies to get through their every day lives, and enjoys the process of tracing the source of discomfort and injury.

A life-long athlete, Sarah enjoys yoga, running, swimming and biking among other things. Sarah has coached swimming, participates in special education wellness programs (Cantor Youth & Special Olympics). Sarah believes that holistic and traditional health should be equally accessible to every individual. She participates in the Collaborative Health For All initiative by Jill’s List in collaboration with Boston Medical Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.

“Good for the body is the work of the body, good for the soul is the work of the soul and good for either is the work of the other.” -Henry David Thoreau.

 

Breathe Deeply

From the desk of Kristen M. Reynolds, PT, DPT, PMA®-CPT….

Take a deep breath. Do your diaphragmatic breathing. Inhale through your nose. Exhale through the mouth. Pranayama. Empty your lungs deeply with gentle contraction of the abdominals. Using your belly breath…

In mind body classes, like Pilates and yoga, these are words and phrases that you often hear from the teacher. However many students seem to feel that breathing during this bodywork is difficult, unnatural, confusing, or just plain unnecessary. It is understandable, as chances are, students have been told several different ways and times to breathe. As long one feels their muscles getting a great workout, then why bother to focus on the breath? Joseph Pilates wrote in Return to Life Through Contrology that, “Breathing is the first act of life, and the last…above all, learn how to breathe correctly.” One should focus on breathing because it is considered an inner shower that cleanses the body, guides the mind, and reawakens the spirit.

This connection between breathing and cleansing is exactly why OMBE’s practitioners have teamed up to offer a spring program called Cleanse Your Core. While spending 5 days of eating whole, nutritious foods that will detox and reboot your system, you can come to OMBE for 5 ballet barre, Pilates, and yoga classes because each of these mind-body fitness regimens incorporates breathing.

Why bother breathing? It…

…enhances circulation to oxygenate blood and nourish the body on a cellular level.

…ejects toxins from the body.

…improves skin tone.

…eases tension from the mind and body.

…increases concentration.

…drives and creates a rhythm for movement.

…promotes increased abdominal contraction.

Kristen Reynolds, DPT, PMA®-CPT
Doctor of Physical Therapy
PMA® Certified Pilates Teacher

Kristen Reynolds earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology with a concentration in Exercise Science from James Madison University in 2006 and a Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the MGH Institute of Health Professions in 2009.

While practicing in orthopedics and sports medicine, a mentor introduced her to the Pilates Method and she has since pursued comprehensive certification to compliment her clinical interests. She is certified by the Pilates Method Alliance, the only professional certification in the field, as well as an active member of American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and APTA Sports Physical Therapy Section.

Always interested in sports and fitness, she is a former dancer, YMCA and Junior Olympic gymnast, coach, and ACE personal trainer. Integrating the Pilates principles and repertoire into her physical therapy practice has produced successful rehabilitation outcomes for a wide variety of patients, including adolescents, elite athletes and dancers, and individuals with chronic orthopedic conditions. Kristen utilizes this alternative therapeutic approach to improve muscle performance and joint mobility, correct posture and alignment, enhance body awareness, and create an evenly conditioned body that is more resilient to extremity and spinal injury. She greatly enjoys designing programs to target personal goals, educating clients to incorporate Pilates into their daily activities, and teaching small group Ballet Barre and Mat classes.