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Basal Body Temperature Charting Part I

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac.DNBAO…

Many patients ask me about basal body temperature charting and whether they should try keeping a chart at home when trying to conceive.   Basal body temping is one of the least invasive and least expensive (the cost is zero unless you need a new thermometer) ways to determine a significant amount of information about your body and your menstrual cycle without subjecting yourself to any invasive testing.

A BBT chart can help you time conception, determine whether you are ovulating or pregnant, as well as trouble shoot common issues related to your cycle or conception that many have gone unnoticed or undiagnosed.  It’s hard to believe that so much information can be determined just by using a thermometer and a piece of paper.  If you have any doubts, pick up a copy of Toni Weschler’s book, Taking Charge of Your Fertility.

What is BBT charting?  It’s the act of simply taking your temperature at approximately the same time every morning to help you chart your menstrual cycle.  By doing so, you create a series of points on a graph that form a pattern helping you or a health practitioner familiar with BBT charts determine your best window to conceive.  Even if you’re not trying to conceive, creating a BBT chart for yourself can help to put yourself in tune with your body in a way that you haven’t been before.  Once you have a sense of your pattern, you can predict peak fertility times in your cycle and use this information to help conceive or avoid pregnancy.  To make it even easier, there are several smartphone apps to help you along the way including one from Taking Charge of Your Fertility.

If you’re just getting started, here are some basic tips to get you started:

  • Take your temperature at the same time each morning
  • Take it before you get out of bed, move, talk, or use the bathroom
  • You must be sleeping for at least 3 hours to get an accurate temperature reading
  • Note that your temperature will rise every ½ hour as you sleep later
  • Heating pads, electric blankets, fevers, and drinking alcohol the night before will raise your temperature
  • Note on your chart if there was any reason that you thought your temperature may not be accurate
  • Circle your temperature on a graph each day or use one of the current smartphone apps
  • Continue to take your temperature for the length of your cycle, beginning Day 1 of your menstrual period until the beginning of your next period

 

Next week, we’ll discuss what to look for on your BBT chart and how to analyze the data!

Do you have more questions about BBT charts or acupuncture?  Schedule a complimentary consult to learn more.  Email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

Immune Empowering Diet Part II: Why Eating the Rainbow Helps Sperm

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac. DNBAO…

This past week we have been writing and talking about New Year’s resolutions including ways to improve your health with every-day foods.  Although many of us strive to eat healthier, I think it’s always easier to make a change when you feel strongly motivated or have a specific reason to do so.  Improving IVF outcomes is a strong reason to motivate any couple to change their diet.  Last week we talked about Immune Empowering Diets  as well as Diet & Fertility  as it relates to women.  Today’s post is all about immune empowering carbohydrates and how they relate to male fertility.

Carbohydrates are an important macronutrient and source of fuel for your body.  When we think major diseases that affect Americans today such as heart disease, allergies, asthma, autoimmune disorders, or osteoarthritis they are seemingly unrelated.  However, they have a common culprit: inflammation.  Foods that contain high levels of antioxidants, minerals, and essential fatty acids can all help to reduce inflammation, boost your immune system, as well as benefit your health in unexpected ways.

In a study completed 10 years ago, the antioxidant supplement, Menevit, was found to reduce oxidative stress in sperm and improve IVF outcomes.  What was in the supplement? Lycopene (found in tomatoes), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, zinc, selenium, as well as a few other antioxidants.  Foods with dark pigments have high antioxidant levels.  So when you think of eating carbohydrates, think of eating from the rainbow-reds, oranges, yellows, greens, blues, and purples.  Tomatoes, sweet potatoes, squash, kale, blueberries, and grapes.  Who knew that choosing the right carbohydrates could improve your immune system and give sperm a boost?  Similarly, eating carbohydrates without color (pasta, bread, white rice, etc…) have the potential to increase levels of inflammation.  Choose quinoa, brown rice, and buckwheat instead.

Want to learn more about immune empowering foods or acupuncture?  Schedule a complimentary consult to learn more about how acupuncture can benefit your health this year.  Email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

Immune Empowering Diets

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac.DNBAO…

This time of year is a natural time to take a closer look at the foods we tend to eat and not eat.  One reason to do so is in the name of your immune system.  Acupuncture is a powerful tool to help support the immune system and decrease levels of inflammation in the body and so are certain food sources.  Your diet can have a profound impact on your immune system, endocrine system, energy levels, and how efficiently your body functions. The right diet can help your body reduce inflammation, cope with stress, survive cold and flu season, and be an important tool in coping with a myriad of health issues. The following recommendations are based on the idea that the one thousand plus meals you eat each year can be a powerful form of medicine.  We’ll discuss fats today as well as other macro and micro nutrients throughout the rest of the week.

Good fats affect mood, behavior, and levels of inflammation in the body.  High, chronic levels of inflammation in the body burdens the immune system. We know through research that supplementing with essential fatty acids can also decrease depression in women postpartum and decrease pain due to osteoarthritis.  What are essential fatty acids (EFAs)?  They are essential because the body does not produce them, therefore, we need to include them in our diet. The two essential fatty acids are known as linoleic acid (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3).  Sources include: salmon, herring, mackerel, cod, olive oil, flax oil, seeds and other nuts such as almonds or walnuts, and avocados.

Want to learn more about acupuncture or an anti-inflammatory diet?  Schedule a complimentary consult to learn more about how acupuncture can benefit your health this year.  Email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

Diet & Fertility

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac.DNBAO…

Although I have posted my Diet & Fertility worksheet that I review with many of my fertility patients, I felt that it deserved another post this week given the theme of a healthy new year.  Although I customize these diet recommendations for my patients, these general rules have the potential to benefit many health conditions. Give it a try!

 

The following recommendations are based on the Nurses’ Health Study, which began in 1989 and followed more than 18,000 female nurses anticipating a pregnancy of the duration of the eight-year study. Visit www.nurseshealthstudy.org to learn more details about the study and participants.

 

  1. Eliminate fast foods from your diet & avoid all other trans-fats.

 

  1. Stop smoking.  Smoking has been linked to abnormal oocytes and heavy metals in follicular fluid. Smokers have been found to take longer to get pregnant and are more likely to miscarry.

 

  1. Use more unsaturated vegetable oils and make sure to include omega-3 fats such as fish oil, olive oil, walnut oil, flax oil, and canola oil.

 

  1. Eat more vegetable protein such as beans and nuts and less animal protein.

 

  1. Choose whole grains and other sources of carbohydrates that have lower, slower effects on blood sugar and insulin rather than refined carbohydrates.

 

  1. Drink a glass of whole milk or have a small dish of ice cream or full-fat yogurt everyday; temporarily trade in skim milk and low or no-fat diary products… for their full-fat cousins.

 

  1. Get plenty of iron from fruits, vegetables, beans but not from red meat. Iron plays a key role in DNA replication and in the maturing of the egg in advance of ovulation. Research shows that women who get enough iron cut their risk of ovulatory infertility by about one half!

 

  1. Take a multivitamin that contains iron, folic acid and other B vitamins. Studies show that regular use of a multivitamin decreases the risk of ovulatory infertility. Multivitamins have been shown to benefit men’s fertility as well, increasing sperm count, quality and motility.

 

  1. Beverages matter: Remove sugary drinks and sodas from your diet.  Drink coffee, tea and alcohol in moderation. High intake of caffeine is linked to infertility due to tubal problems or endometriosis but was not associated with ovulatory infertility. Water is great.

 

  1. Overall-maintain a healthy weight:  Losing or gaining 5-10% of your body weight can have a significant impact on ovulation.  Women with a BMI between 20-24 were found to be least likely to have experienced ovulatory infertility.
  1. Aim to eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables a day, choosing from a variety of all colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, & purple).

 

SOURCES

 

  1. David, Sami S. M.D., Blakeway, Jill. Making Babies. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company, 2009. 121.
  2. David, Sami S. M.D., Blakeway, Jill. Making Babies. New York, NY: Little, Brown and Company,2009.115.
  3. Chavarro, Jeorge E. M.D., Willett, Walter C. M.D. The Fertility Diet. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill. 2008.143

 

Want to try acupuncture this year?  Schedule a complimentary consult to learn more about how acupuncture can benefit your health this year.  Email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

Male Fertility: Top 10 Things to Do Now!

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO…

Male infertility affects one in twenty men, contributing to half of all infertility issues.  The following is a summary of recommendations based on recent research and findings.  The general goal of these recommendations is to increase circulating levels of antioxidants and reduce free radical stress.  Infertile men have been found to have a higher concentration of free radicals in their semen as compared to fertile men.  High levels of free radicals within semen have been shown to cause damage to the sperm membrane and DNA.  Studies suggest that 30–80% of infertile men have oxidative stress-related infertility.

  1.  Seek medical advice early in the process to rule out infections, varicoceles, blocked ejaculatory ducts, thyroid disorders, celiac disease, or other known causes of male infertility
  1.  Avoid excessive heat especially near the scrotal area including waterbeds, heating pads/blankets, saunas, hot tubs, using laptop computers (on the lap), or wearing tight clothing (biking shorts, jock straps, etc…) that will result in a temperature increase
  1. Do Not Smoke.  Smoking and exposure to environmental pollutants are linked with excess free radical production, which in turn damages sperm DNA.  Smoking has also been shown to decrease sperm motility, sperm morphology, and cause erectile dysfunction.
  1. Do not use marijuana, steroids, performance enhancing drugs, or other recreational drugs.  Marijuana stays in the testes for up to two weeks meaning that habitual use can affect sperm function.
  1.  Limit caffeine and alcohol to moderate intake levels.  Excessive caffeine and alcohol intake is linked with poor fertility. The general consensus is that 300 mg or 2-3 5 oz. cups of coffee and no more than 2 glasses of alcohol per day for men are considered a moderate levels of intake.
  1. Maintain a healthy weight and check your BMI. Overweight men are 50% more likely to have fertility problems as well as having lower testosterone levels and lower sperm motility.
  1. Exercise regularly and moderately: 30-minutes, 5 times/week.  Consider increasing your activity level if you are inactive. Similarly, consider cutting back on your training regimen if you are training for a marathon, triathlon, or other long-distance sport.
  1. Improve your nutrition status by improving your diet in the following three categories. Fats: Reduce your saturated fat intake and increase your omega-3 fatty acid consumption.  Proteins:  Reduce animal protein sources, and increase vegetable protein sources.  Carbohydrates:  Decrease “white” foods such as bread, pasta, rice, bagels etc…, and increase your foods of color (red peppers, carrots, squash, kale, blueberries, grapes).
  1. Take a Multivitamin:  Antioxidants help reduce the effects of free radicals.  Eat antioxidant rich foods and take a multivitamin to help counter the effects of free radicals.
  1. According to a recent research study, a multivitamin containing the following ingredients had benefits for sperm counts all across the board. Check to see if your multivitamin contains the following ingredients/dosages and supplement accordingly:

Lycopene 6 mg

Vitamin E 400 IU

Vitamin C 100 mg

Zinc 25 mg

Selenium 26 μgm

Folate 0.5 mg

Garlic 1000 mg

Want to try acupuncture this year?  Schedule a complimentary consult to learn more about how acupuncture can benefit your health this year.  Email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

Endometriosis & The Environment

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac.DNBAO….

Many physicians and patients know that acupuncture is a great tool for women suffering from endometriosis including those trying to conceive.  Did you know that there is a link between endometriosis and the environment?  In addition to lifestyle modifications that I discuss with my patients about diet, nutritional supplementation, as well as other therapies, we also talk about chemicals that may have a role in endometriosis and other pelvic inflammatory conditions.  The following is a list of recommendations for chemicals to avoid:

These chemicals have been know to mimic estrogen, become stored in fat cells, and disrupt the endocrine system.  In the early 1970s, a group of rhesus monkeys were exposed to dioxins and PCBs.  Endometriosis developed in 79% of the those that were exposed and 33% of the monkeys not exposed. According to a 2003 report, more than 60 hormone-disrupting chemicals and 27 pesticides were found in samples taken from 120 homes in the Cape Cod area of Massachusetts.

  • Dioxins: Found in non-organic beef, poultry, and dairy products.  Also found in bleach and chlorine products, bleached toilet paper, sanitary napkins, and tampons.
  • BPAs: Water bottles, baby bottles, canned food, and more.  BPA increases insulin resistance and mimics estrogen.
  • Xenoestrogens: Found in plastic bottles, wraps, and food storage containers.
  • Parabens: Found in perfumes, bath and body products, make-up, and anything listed with a “fragrance.”
  • PCBs: Pesticides, paints, fire retardants, and wood floor finishings.
  • PVCs: Found in plumbing fixtures, rain gear, shower curtains, vinyl flooring, and toys.
  • Pesticides & Fungicides: Choose non-chemical treatments whenever possible.
  • MSG/Aspartame: Found in the great majority of packaged foods, chewing gum, diet sodas and other diet beverages, “sugar-free” treats, some candies, and more.

Want to learn more about endometriosis and acupuncture this year?  Schedule a complimentary consult to learn more about how acupuncture can benefit your health this year.  Email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

More Relaxing Rituals from OMBE

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac.DNBAO….

We began 2017 with a few relaxing rituals to help you start of the New Year.  Check out yesterday’s blog for more ideas to help you reduce your stress levels for the upcoming year.  Here are a few more to help you add a little more zen into your day:

 

 

7.GET OUTSIDE & PLAY

Have you ever heard kids complain about the cold weather? Take a lesson from children and get outside to play this winter. Equip yourself with the right clothing and pick up a winter sport-snowshoeing, skiing, or winter photography are just a few. You’ll be surprised at how energized you may feel after braving the cold! 

8.FORGIVE & LET GO

Forgiving and letting go may be difficult but it is even more draining and stressful to carry grudges. You can symbolically let go by writing a letter expressing how you feel and explaining why you need to move on. You don’t need to mail the letter but it may help in just expressing yourself. You can burn the paper or cast it away somewhere when you are really ready to say goodbye.

9.TEA FOR ONE

Take a vacation in your kitchen. Cultivate your tea sense and keep a personal kettle, tea cup and your favorite teas on hand. Sit quietly alone or share this old ritual with friends. Hot tea may just warm up your body this winter or your spirit!

10. GET IN TOUCH

No matter how stressful your day is, try to put things into perspective by reaching out to a friend or family member that may be struggling a bit more this season. The winter can be an especially lonely time and even depressing for people feeling isolated.   Give them a call or even better-invite them to dinner.

11.BE S.M.A.R.T.!

How many times have you made and broken resolutions for yourself? This year, look at goal-making in a different light. Write down a list of areas in your life-family, health, personal, work, financial, educational or spiritual. Set SMART goals: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Time-Bound.

 12. EXERCISE!

Need motivation? Ask for help or try something new. Stepping outside your comfort zone can be liberating and inspiring. It may be that single class, training session or spa treatment that helps you turn a page in achieving your best health.

Want to try acupuncture this year?  Schedule a complimentary consult here or email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

Happy 2017 from OMBE! Relaxing Rituals for the New Year

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac.DNBAO….

Acupuncture is a powerful tool to help combat the affects of chronic stress.  We know via research that acupuncture sessions increase the body’s natural endorphins, boost the immune system, and have the potential to reduce both inflammation and cortisol levels.

However, we thought that we would begin 2017 with a little extra R&R in the form of some stress-reducing rituals that are easy to adapt regardless of your post-holiday status.  Here are a few to get you started:

1. ADOPT A MANTRA:

Positive thinking has a way of becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy. The words you say can bring out your best. Make up your own personal slogan for the day or try one of the following.

“OM” OR

“I am doing my best and that’s good enough.” OR

“I will breathe and stay focused in the moment.”  OR

“I will travel through my day peacefully” OR

“I will treat myself and others with kindness and patience”

2. YOU HAVE MAIL

It is virtually impossible these days to not stay in touch but maybe you need a break. On a daily or weekly basis, turn off your phone, resist checking emails, text messages, tweets etc…and take a time out. If it’s important, they will leave a message.   Give yourself a media break as well-turn off the TV and stop reading the news.

3. BECOME A MASSAGE THERAPIST

Before bedtime, take a moment to acknowledge what hurts. It is easy to get caught up in the day and ignore our bodies so tune in and listen. You can ease some of your discomfort or just relax by massaging some of these tender spots. Try your eyes, scalp, face, feet or hands. This is also a great pick-me-up at the office or in the car.

4. JOURNAL

Spend 5-10 minutes each week or month adding to a journal. You can make this task as formal or informal as you want. Try writing for 5 minutes continuously without editing and you may be surprised at what your subconscious reveals. This can also be a great way to take time out to reflect on where you’ve been in the last few months and where you are going. If you are too caught up in day-to-day events, use this journal to make and set goals for yourself.

 5. BE AN EXPERT DRIVER

You are racing around to finish errands when someone cuts you off and slams on their horn! Don’t let rude drivers get to you this year! Lay off your horn unless there is a real emergency or danger on the road. Try to make eye contact, smile and wave hello at the offending driver. You will be surprised at how much better you feel and you may get a few smiles in return! If you’re in Boston, their surprised reaction might be worth a laugh.

6. MEDITATE

Find a quiet place where you can’t be disturbed. Meditating is simply the act of focusing your mind on one thing. Close your eyes and practice your breathing. Visualize bringing positive energy through the top of your head as you inhale and releasing negative energy through your feet as you exhale. Count to four for each inhale and exhale. When your mind wanders, tell the interrupting thoughts, “Later!”. Focus on a mantra or phrase, a color or image. If you have always wanted to meditate, but can’t seem to find the time, try practicing the first 5 minutes after climbing into bed.

Need a few more relaxing rituals to start your 2017?  Check out tomorrow’s blog.

Want to try acupuncture this year?  Schedule a complimentary consult here or email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

Happy New Year from OMBE! Women’s Health Top 10 List for 2017

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac.DNBAO…

We are so grateful for many things in this past year including the health and well-being of our patients, family, friends, and colleagues.  Before we begin our 2017 Women’s Health Top 10 List, we want to thank both Boston Magazine and Expertise for acknowledging OMBE with awards in 2016. Both Boston Magazine and Expertise listed OMBE as one of the Best Acupuncture Centers in Boston.  Check out the full articles here:

Boston Magazine: Best Acupuncture Center

Expertise: Best Acupuncturists in Boston

In the meantime, we want to kick off the New Year with a Top 10 List for Women’s Health.  Many of my patients are trying to conceive or tackling related women’s health conditions such as endometriosis or PCOS that impact not only their fertility but their day-to-day life.  Here’s my list of nutrition and diet therapies that you can add to your resolution list this year if you also fall into one of the above categories.

  1. Reduce Overall Saturated Fat Intake: A diet high in saturated is known to stimulate estrogen overproduction.
  1. Increase Fiber Intake: The fiber contained in grains and vegetables reduces estrogen levels. Good sources of fiber include: most vegetables such as peas, whole grains such as barley, and beans such as lentils.
  1. Increase Foods of Color: Optimize your diet by including 5-7 servings of colored foods with a full color spectrum.  Include foods found to optimize liver function such as onions, garlic, leeks, and pineapple.  Include vegetables that modulate estrogen levels: asparagus, carrots, squash, kale, collard greens, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage, turnips.
  1. Reduce Animal Protein Sources: Meat sources contain both natural and synthetic (if non-organic) hormones that can stimulate estrogen overproduction.  Limit red meat consumption to one to zero servings per week.
  1. Reduce Non-Organic Food Sources: Non-organic food sources contain synthetic pesticides, fungicides, hormones, and other chemicals that add to the daily load of your immune system.  Eliminate processed meats and cheeses.
  1. Reduce or Eliminate Sugar Sources: Fluctuating sugar levels in the bloodstream trigger an insulin response which in turn will change other hormone production.  Avoid refined carbohydrates such as white bread, muffins, pastries, pizza etc…
  1. Consider Common Food Allergens: Many foods including wheat, dairy, or soy can create a mild to severe allergic reaction in the body increasing the body’s overall inflammation levels.  Avoid these products or do an elimination diet to see how your body responds.
  1. Consider Reducing or Eliminating Alcohol: Alcohol can compromise the efficient functioning of the liver and make it less able to metabolize hormones.
  1.  Consider Reducing or Eliminating Caffeine: According to available research, high intake of caffeine is linked to infertility due to tubal problems or endometriosis but is not associated with ovulatory infertility.
  1. Include a Multi-Vitamin: Make sure that it includes the recommended dose for calcium, zinc, iron, potassium, magnesium, selenium, Vitamin A, C, E, and Vitamin B.  B vitamins are essential for an endometriosis diet because they play a role in lowering estrogen levels.
  1.  Include Sources of Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Sources include cold-water fish and fish oils, olive oil, evening primrose oil, safflower oil, walnut oil, flaxseeds or oil, avocados, and other nuts/seeds.  Omega-3 fatty acids help to reduce inflammation and regulate prostaglandin levels associated with endometriosis.

Want to try acupuncture this year?  Schedule a complimentary consult at our Boston office to learn what acupuncture is all about!  Email jlmolleur@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.

From the desk of Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac.DNBAO….

In addition to those health resolutions, most of us are thinking about ways to get moving in January to work off those last pieces of pumpkin pie. If an injury is keeping you from moving or doing what you love to do,  here is my top 10 list of reasons to try acupuncture for orthopedic conditions and injuries:

  1. Achilles tendonitis
  1. Ankle sprains
  1. Degenerative disc disease
  1. IT band syndrome
  1. Knee osteoarthritis
  1. Low back pain
  1. Piriformis syndrome
  1. Plantar fasciitis
  1. Rotator cuff injuries
  1. Shin Splints

 

Want to try acupuncture this year?  Schedule a complimentary consult to learn what it all about!  Email info@ombecenter.com for more details.

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO

Licensed Acupuncturist

Jessica L. Molleur, Lic.Ac., DNBAO is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist, and massage therapist in Massachusetts and California. She holds a Masters of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, CA. Her training also includes a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Physiology from the University of California at Davis, CA. She is a National Diplomate of Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine, Chinese Herbology and Acupuncture Orthopedics. This orthopedic specialty certification is held by fewer than 300 acupuncturists in the United States. Jessica founded OMBE to integrate the best of Eastern and Western medicine. The center’s green philosophy reflects her commitment to the environment.